Bridging the Divide - Summer Series
Course Descriptions

Creating and Deploying Multiple Moodle Quiz Versions

Session 1 June 22-29
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Glenn Lo, Nicholls

Participants will be taught how to create multiple versions of Moodle quizzes (different questions of comparable difficulties, not just shuffling of choices and question order). Being able deploy a Moodle quiz so that a unique version is randomly generated every time it is attempted is beneficial because it can (1) help minimize cheating in high-stakes exams and (2) provide opportunities for mastery learning through homework.

The Excellent Excel Experience (E3)

Session 1 June 22-29
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Mary Edith Stacy, Northwestern State University

This session will begin with utilizing an open source learning style(s) inventory to assist both the presenter and participant with identifying individual learning styles and strategies to be a more successful learner. Microsoft Excel will be engaged to demonstrate active learning activities to enhance instructional design. Examples will be provided for Business Statistics and Personal Finance coursework that can applicable across many other curriculums. Participants will be instructed on how to produce videos that will foster instructor-to-student relationships resulting in increased interaction between both parties. A constant theme of addressing all learning styles, while developing online content, will be present throughout the session. Participants will operationalize the Microsoft Power Point Screen Recording tool for creating videos.  The process will culminate with the uploading of videos to Microsoft Stream for immediate launch into any Learning Management System (LMS). Prior Microsoft Office applications experience is necessary for this session to be successful. 

Connection Beyond the Forum: 3 Opportunities for Interactive Online Discussions

Session 1 June 22-29
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Janeal White, McNeese State University

Post 1 + Reply 2 ≠ magical online discussion formula.  As educators, we know the importance of students having discussions as part of their academic experience.  Well designed discussions support achievement of higher levels of cognitive thinking as well as increased mastery of course content and development of important social connections with peers.  In a face-to-face classroom setting, class discussions organically evolve.  But when we transition to an online environment what happens to those valuable discussions?  They are usually relegated to the LMS forum where they will die a slow and painful death.  But it doesn’t have to be this way!  During this 3-hour professional development session, participants will explore how the integration of Microsoft Teams, Voicethread, or Flipgrid into online learning environments can empower educators to create opportunities for fun, engaging, and meaningful student dialogue.  Participants will view examples and practice using new platforms to promote student-to-student dialogue.  “How To” guides for set-up, example prompts and rubrics, and descriptions for inclusion in syllabi will be provided.  Synchronous participants will be invited to attend live discussion sessions while asynchronous attendees will have access to the previously recorded sessions.

Moodle Gradebook - Aggregation without Aggravation

Session 1 June 22-29
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Jonathan Young, University of Louisiana Monroe

This course will examine the various gradebook aggregation methods and how they can be applied based on certain grading philosophies. Of the nine aggregation strategies within Moodle, the content will focus on the Mean of Grades, Weighted Mean of Grades, Simple Weighted Mean of Grades, and Natural aggregation types. The remaining five types are either self-explanatory situational use cases [Median of Grades, Smallest Grade, Highest Grade, and Mode of Grades] or exist solely for legacy support within Moodle [Mean of grades (with extra credits)]. The use of categories and methods which provide avenues for allowing “extra credit” will also be discussed. Best practices will be considered with an emphasis on maintaining simplicity to facilitate clear communication of student progress. Following these foundational concepts in the use of Moodle Gradebook, attention will be given to some of the common pitfalls that can lead to instructor frustration and root causes of student/instructor miscommunication with regards to gradebook setup. Methods will be included that will allow the instructor to see the gradebook from a student’s point of view in an effort to self-diagnose and troubleshoot problems early. The course will employ two optional Zoom sessions as a form of office hours with the facilitator to ask any questions for clarification concerning the topics presented within. Final deliverables within the course will be a gradebook plan for an upcoming course that applies the grade aggregation method(s) of choice to make that concept digital as well as a case study/quiz on troubleshooting common gradebook issues. 

Backward Design

Session 1 June 22-29
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Eric von Holm, University of New Orleans

Backward design is a method of course development that emphasizes the goals of a course over its content. Backward design begins by identifying learning outcomes or the end goal of taking a class for the students. Knowing the destination the class is meant to reach, the teacher can then choose standards of evaluation that will help to measure whether those goals are achieved. Once an end goal and standards of evaluation are developed, the course content is developed with the purpose of reaching the intended destination. Backward design thus reverses the focus of forward design, which too often begins by selecting content of the course and then developing the assessments to match the content. As college classes are being increasingly moved online, it is important for teachers to re-center their course on the learning outcomes associated with the class, rather than the existing content they have developed for in-person sessions. Backward design helps to ensure that weekly content remains focused and organized around the selected purpose of the class. Those who select this module will receive an overview of backward design, take a quiz on its characteristics, and be given worksheets to help them in future course development.

Six Strategies for Designing Engaging Discussion Boards

Session 1 June 22-29
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Liangyue Lu, Grambling State University

Discussion is a learner-centered instructional approach. The approach promotes deep thinking of course content and helps to cultivate students’ critical thinking and problem-solving skills. In an online course, the asynchronous discussion board is also an important tool to create interaction among the instructor and the students. In this professional development course, you will be introduced to six strategies for designing engaging asynchronous online discussion boards in three modules. In Module 1, you will be introduced to the discussion approach and the revised Bloom’s taxonomy. In Module 2, you will learn six strategies to create engaging asynchronous online discussion boards. These strategies include: 1) Promote deep thinking by asking in-depth questions about the course content; 2) Encourage collaborative learning; 3) Organize debates; 4) Incorporate personal life experience; 5) Conduct mini-survey or interview; 6) Critique and evaluate. The instructor will also indicate which cognitive level in the revised Bloom’s taxonomy each strategy addresses. By participating in one of the six discussion boards, you will learn how to apply one of the strategies from both an instructor’s and a student’s perspective. In Module 3, you will reflect on the learning experience in this course in a synchronous video conferencing session. At the end of the course, you will create an asynchronous discussion board using one of the strategies introduced. The maximum time required for participation in the course is five hours.

Fostering Group Work in an Online Course

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Jessica Dolecheck, University of Louisiana at Monroe

The course outlines best practices for designing effective team projects in online courses. Participants will learn how team projects enhance essentials skills related to communication, relationship building and other academic competencies that each group member brings to the group. The course outlines seven best practices for planning and implementing successful group projects in online courses. Tips and tools for designing a team project, establishing group rules, and evaluating group projects are reviewed. Sample collaborative assignments, grading forms and rubrics for group projects are provided. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to 1) Explain the importance of online group project work as related to academic and professional careers; 2) Discuss planning, design and relevance for successful group projects done virtually. 3) Identify various collaborative assignments and assessments suited to meet both the course objectives and the asynchronous nature of the online classroom.

OER/AER Library Resources

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Megan Lowe, University of Louisiana at Monroe

The cost of college has undeniably risen in the last few years, and cuts to higher education budgets have often forced institutions of higher learning to pass costs on to students. Many students incur significant student loan debt in order to attend college. These costs are often compounded by expensive course texts and materials. These additional costs represent barriers to student learning which in turn negatively impact student persistence and retention. One solution to the course text cost conundrum is represented in alternatives to traditional texts. These alternatives include open and affordable education resources (OER/AER). This course will introduce participants to OER/AER. Additionally, participants will learn about sources for each type of educational resource and will focus substantively on the role that libraries play in the OER/AER ecosystem on college campuses. This course will address the following features of OER/AER: the differences between the two types; pros and cons of each type of resource; sources for each type of resource; examples of each; opportunities for growth with each type of resource (including state and national grant opportunities); and how to partner with librarians and libraries to gain access to such resources, particularly LOUIS initiatives. Using OER/AER represents an opportunity to help increase accessibility and affordability for college students which in turn can help increase persistence and retention. Collaborating with librarians and libraries represents a prime opportunity to help students and enhance higher learning.

Best Course Design Practices to Reduce Inequities for Students with Learning Disabilities

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 1

Course Facilitator:  William McCown, University of Louisiana at Monroe

More than a fifth of college students have a learning disability or similar academically- related impairment. Yet many experienced, well-intentioned faculty are uninformed of these students’ needs. This may be especially true in online classes where these  students can be inadvertently overlooked, or their requirements may seem too complex to successfully address. Yet given how the disability community has struggled to earn access to education as a basic right, it is essential to consider these disabilities in terms of diversity and equity. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a useful first consideration for instructors searching for greater online course equity. Premises of UDL are that all learners differ in how they navigate learning environments and the ways that they express what they have learned. Best practices incorporate these differences to optimize learning outcomes. UDL guidelines include evidence-based suggestions from cognitive science to allow online and other courses to be more accessible for everyone. Specific “how to” guidelines offer recommendations that can be applied to almost any discipline to better ensure that all learners can participate in meaningful online classroom learning opportunities. More specific contributions for online learning beyond UDL guidelines have been made by major stakeholder communities. These include suggestions for students with dyspraxias, epilepsy and seizure disorders, attention problems, memory disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, and auditory and visual impairments. We will consider these in highlighting strategies for maximal online classroom accessibility and fairness including suggestions for alternative discussion formats and assessment strategies.

Four Instant Response and One Grading Technology Tools for Online Learning

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 1

Course Facilitator:  Ahmad Fayed, Southeastern Louisiana University

The learning objectives of this course are to: (1) Utilize and integrate live/instant response tools into online classes, (2) Integrate interactive offline feedback tools into online class, and (3) Utilize online assisting grading tools for online classes.  The course is designed to equip educators with some technology tools that make online/remote class delivery more effective and engaging. While there is no magic technology tool that can improve all aspects of class delivery (One size will not fit all!), it is possible to overcome the challenge and customize the use of these tools to our needs and wisely use them to achieve the desired improvements. It is also true that technology is capable of providing great solutions but it can be a distraction and waste of time and effort if not utilized properly. This class will introduce four technology tools for Instant response/feedback (including REEF, Menti, Piazza, Kahoot) and 1 online grading tool (Gradescope). Hands-on activities will be presented to practice these 5 tools and guidelines will be given to complete a project that requires the use of at least 2 of these tools in the context of the educator’s own teaching field. 

Communicating and Ensuring Course Alignment to Learning Objectives

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 2

Course Facilitators: Yanzhu Wu and Andrea Leonard, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

According to the Quality Matters Rubric, ensuring course alignment is a foundation of effective course design. The concept of alignment emphasizes that critical course components must support and assess the learner’s achievement of clearly stated learning objectives. In this asynchronous course, participants will learn how to write effective Course and Module Level Learning Objectives that are written from the learner’s perspective and match the overall level of the course according to Bloom’s Taxonomy. They will then identify how to ensure the alignment of these objectives with the following course components: assessments, instructional materials, learning activities, and course technology tools. An examination will be made of both proper alignment and misalignment, and participants will engage in a discussion forum to explore possible solutions for the latter. Participants will also take quizzes to assess their ability to identify elements of alignment. Finally, participants will learn common strategies to display alignment prominently to students and share their plan on communicating course alignment in their own course design.

Setting Student Expectations in the Age of Remote Course Delivery

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Steven Toaddy, Louisiana Tech University

The habits and expectations to which students have grown accustomed during in-person course delivery – involving physical colocation with faculty, business hours, scheduled office hours, and time before and after courses, for instance – may no longer be justifiable in an age of remote course delivery. Using a student-focused framework, we’ll consider, set, and plan how to communicate student expectations regarding roles and responsibilities, faculty availability, and assessment.

Exploring QM and Active Learning

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 2

Course Facilitators: Danielle Williams and Rudolph Ellis

The track two-session online project focuses on best practices of Quality Matters to promote equity and quality of online learning. Quality Matters standards are based on research. These standards or guidelines help facilitators to create courses in which students learn effectively in virtual classroom settings. Breaking out of the traditional teaching is not always easy. Quality Matters (QM) is a faculty-driven peer-review process used to ensure the quality of online and blended course design. Active learning is an approach to teaching that seeks to expand the classroom experience beyond the lecture and improve learner outcomes. In this interactive session, participates will explore different learning styles that can foster active learning to encourage collaboration, increase learner motivation, and promote critical and creative thinking skills that are effective for the virtual or blended classroom. Facilitators will address evidence-based research methods and reflection to promote a greater understanding of alignment and active learning.

Creating a Virtual Escape Room with Google Drive

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 3

Course Facilitator:  Stacie Austin, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Participants will learn basic skills using Google Slides, Docs, and Forms to create an interactive virtual escape room experience. Virtual escape rooms can be used to reinforce and assess learning. Learners will follow screen capture videos to duplicate Google slides, docs, and forms based upon their area of expertise to design and implement a plan for creating a digital escape room. In the training, learners will collaborate and reflect on the functionality and effectiveness of the digital escape rooms through discussion boards. The training will provide the background structure for a virtual escape room with functioning links, leaving flexibility to create puzzles for any subject matter. The course will guide the participants in the step-by-step process of creating a flexible structure for a virtual escape room to optimize digital instruction. In order for participants to fully grasp the concepts and create a digital structure and links, the time requirement will be four hours. The low stakes assessments will take place in each module of the four modules and represent building blocks for the escape room.

How to Differentiate in the Virtual Classroom

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Cherissa Vitter, Southeastern Louisiana University

The task is to assess student understanding through performance.  How do you know if students learned and at what level of understanding?  Using a differentiation assessment model will inform instruction. Wiggins and McTighe suggest that authentic assessments replicate real-life situations and allow for feedback and refinement (Wiggins & McTighe, 2008).  One of the assessment challenges in the virtual environment is assessment differentiation between informal and summative assessments.  Informal assessment may be accomplished through small assignments, journaling, reflecting, and a myriad of other options.  In a class setting, instructors constantly informally assess student understanding through observation and questioning.  In virtual classrooms, the instructor is not always able to see students’ reactions to new content.  Informal assessments are used to inform teaching.  This type of assessment may be used in the virtual classroom in a variety of ways depending on your subject area.  Because the entire course is centered on differentiation, the course will model differentiated assessment models. 1) Participants will demonstrate an understanding of differentiated instruction through assignment-based assessment. 2) Participants will demonstrate an understanding of differentiated assessment through an objective-alignment assignment. 3) Participants will reflect on differentiation techniques that are applicable to their respective subjects through journaling reflection. Participants will leave the course with an understanding, an action plan, and resources of differentiated instruction and assessment for the virtual classroom.

Using Digital Technology and Resources to Enhance Mathematics Virtually

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Milisha Hart-Simmons, Grambling State University

The COVID-19 global pandemic brought to light that not all disciplines have embraced the use of digital technology to promote student learning in the delivery of content. One discipline at Grambling State University that fell into this category was mathematics. This resulted in me working with mathematics faculty during the Spring 2020 semester in converting their face-to-face courses to 100% online delivery. Since FALL 2019, my traditional face to face mathematics courses have been built as self-paced courses using the Canvas Learning Management System and a Cengage platform. This design has allowed students to enhance their mathematics skills using digital technology and resources that support creative assessments. Regardless of my versatility in teaching, however, I sympathized with the challenge that some of my mathematics colleagues experienced when trying to transition their courses to online delivery. The focus of this training will be to equip mathematics faculty with the skills that are needed to identify appropriate digital resources and to incorporate these resources into course delivery, whether 100% online or in traditional face to face format. A further aim is to enable mathematics faculty with the ability to organize lessons in a variety of different ways through the implementation of appropriately matched technologies and teaching methodologies. The general objective of this training is to improve digital and technological literacy and skills of faculty. Because mathematics educators have a diverse range of experiences with navigating and integrating different sets of digital technology, this training will target those with limited to no experience.

College to Career Success in the 21st Century

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 4

Track 4
Course Facilitator: Jessica Dolecheck, University of Louisiana at Monroe

The course outlines key career competencies that college students should obtain for successful transition into the workforce. Participants will learn what today’s employees are looking for in graduates to be “career ready” and techniques for incorporating these essential skills into existing curricula. Particular emphasis is put on the importance of the four “C”s of 21st century skills – critical thinking, communication, collaboration (inclusion and diversity), and creativity that can be used as guide for integrating these skills in and outside the classroom. Principles of good teaching and assessment consistent with the development of employability skills are reviewed. Assessment strategies and rubrics will be explored. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) explain what career competencies are and why they are needed to be career ready, 2) identify the four Cs of 21st Century education and resources that advance these skills in the classroom setting, 3) explore assessment strategies that may be successfully embedded within academic curricula, and 4) identify various techniques for embedding soft skills within online courses.

Remote Academic Advising

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Joanna Hunter, University of Louisiana at Monroe

This course is about gaining a better understanding of the remote academic advising role in higher education. It will discuss communication, problem solving, and resources related to providing a student what they need to succeed online.

Service Learning and Career Development in the Distance Classroom

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 4

Course Facilitator: William G McCown, University of Louisiana at Monroe

For many college students, educational experiences outside the classroom are places to acquire proficiencies, knowledge, and connections that matter the most beyond graduation. Data shows that students identify course-related service learning and internships as uniquely helpful preparations for workforce readiness. Research also shows that involvement in cocurricular activities encourages student engagement and persistence and may even foster lifelong critical thinking skills. However, most online classes offer limited opportunities for these experiences. They also fail to provide students valuable opportunities for learning through involvement in professional and honor societies and in membership and leadership in student-related organizations. By not planning to allow for these learning possibilities, we inequitably handicap our online learners. This class will look at practical ways that service learning, career cocurricular activities, and extra-class student involvement have been successfully incorporated into online learning communities. While the challenge of creating connectedness in a virtual environment continues to be a process of experimentation, some strategies are highly promising. Using best practices developed over the past fifteen years throughout North America we will examine what works for whom and when. We will see what solutions faculty and students have generated that meet the needs of a variety of distance learners and that students see as highly valuable. Finally, we will see how recent changes in technology now allow more opportunities for student co-curriculum engagement in novel, highly promising ways that may have a positive workforce-ready impact.

Career Skills and Readiness Online

Session 2 June 29 - July 6
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Paul Rainey, McNeese State University

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined eight core competencies—critical thinking, communication, teamwork, digital technology, intercultural fluency, work ethic, leadership, and career management—that employers value when hiring recent college and graduate school graduates. These competencies enhance the technical, discipline-specific skill sets that students acquire through their area of study and are often developed through the coursework and student experiences of attending college. Accordingly, these competencies are often the differentiating factor when employers make hiring decisions between two otherwise equivalent candidates. The difficulty for students comes down to a) defining core competency opportunities in their collegiate experience and b) communicating their value to employers and graduate or professional schools. Both faculty and student affairs professionals can be instrumental in helping students’ success in these two areas. This professional development course would train University of Louisiana System faculty and administrators on how to a) define core competencies, b) develop core competencies into online coursework and virtual student experiences, and c) create and use online tools for helping students communicate efficacy of core competencies to prospective employers and graduate institutions.

Developing Interactive Moodle Tutorials 

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Glenn Lo, Nicholls State University

Effective online tutorials facilitate the implementation of fully online asynchronous instruction or flipped instruction where more class meeting time (face-to-face or virtual) is utilized for student engagement.  This workshop will teach participants how to develop and deploy interactive tutorials using a Moodle quiz.  Strategies to facilitate the development process will emphasize the use of the Cloze multi-part question type to implement the principle of explanatory questioning and the leveraging of free software tools and internet resources such as OER textbooks and videos on YouTube.  Strategies for eliciting feedback from students will also be presented.  

Virtual Canvas Training for Online Faculty during COVID 19 

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Eldrie B. Hamilton, Grambling State University

Canvas is the Learning Management System (LMS) now used at many community colleges and universities in the United States and particularly in Louisiana. Canvas gives access to online, hybrid, and web enhanced courses.  Canvas use by an instructor can be as uncomplicated as posting just a few things for a class such as syllabus and assignments, or as intricate as a totally online course with discussion boards, online chats, online tests and group collaborations, Canvas is used in conjunction with numerous software tools such as ProctorU, SmarterID, Smarter Proctoring, Online Meetings, Turnitin, Echo 360, and others to provide a seamlessly integrated delivery system for effective teaching and learning in web-based environments. The Canvas LMS offers many features to assist online faculty with delivering instruction to students in a hybrid/online environment.  The overall goal is to provide virtual training on how to use the LMS and other tools for online learning.  Online faculty will have, as examples, a fully online training course, and course models to aid as blueprints to guide them in buttonology along with step by step usage of external learning software. By the end of the course, faculty will be able to create an online course in the Learning Management System (LMS) and be able to demonstrate the use of external software (SmarterID, SmarterProctoring, TurnItIn, Echo 360) in the online course.

Innovative and Engaging Course Content

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Jacinta R. Saffold, University of New Orleans

Think of this course as preparation to help students enter a digital workforce through creative literature assignments. Four (4) resources for innovative assignments specific for teaching literature will be covered; including: open access digital archives and collections; Voyant, Twine, and Scalar.

Rethinking Grading of Student Work – Pandemic or No

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Steven Toaddy, Louisiana Tech University

Recent events give us a great opportunity to reflect on the appropriateness and adequacy of our student-evaluation philosophies. In this course, we’ll reflect on and refocus our grading strategies, exploring such topics as whether we are responsible for differentiating students using our grading system, how assessment serves as education, whether multiple attempts at assessments are warranted, and when and how curving is appropriate – with techniques to match.

Equity Matters in Course Design

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Anita Sharma, University of Louisiana at Monroe

This course will focus on creating online courses that take into account student-disparities in terms of their knowledge and access to technology, and their readiness for online learning.

Finding Flexibility for Students with Technology and Personal Challenges

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 2

Course Facilitator: William McCown, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Many students are attracted to online learning because it works exceptionally well to meet their needs and career goals. Online learning is effective, affordable, and convenient. Currently, the best online classes typically provide a technology-rich environment to facilitate the needs of different learning styles. Yet students who lack sufficient technological access or have other challenges are often handicapped from full and fair participation. Common reasons may include poor internet access that exists in many rural and urban areas. Some students may also lack basic cell phone services. Students with substantial personal or family crises, distractions, and unstable home lives, or shifting employment demands may also be unable to perform to their online potential. A lack of at-home privacy or sharing computer resources can interfere with punctual online participation. Furthermore, students with neurodiversities may not be able to fully participate in online media rich environments. The Covid-19 crisis has taught us that there is no single template for universal fairness. However, adherences to online class basic design principles and the concepts from Quality Matters may help make online classes more equitable for most situations. Specific best practices for enhancing class flexibility are also now evolving. This class with explore some of these including the use of parallel lower bandwidth assignments, alternative assessments, media repositories, reemphasis on University libraries, availability of ancillary magnetic and traditional media, alternative and contingency assignments, flexible deadlines, and increased use of peer support and student team-based learning methods.

Forget the Lecture: Incorporating Eduflow and Flipgrid to Promote Student Engagement Online

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Cindy McGuire, Northwestern State University

Online course development requires more than content expertise. Incorporating active learning techniques such as chunking activities and peer-review can positively influence student motivation and engagement. In this session, we will explore key components of active learning and examples of how it can be easily implemented within an online course. Participants will also gain insight into ways to build a more inclusive online environment that encourages student engagement using readily accessible technologies.  This course will facilitate modules in which participants will explore instructional activities that can be implemented within an online course to promote active learning. Module content will provide relevance and examples of incorporating chunking activities such as concept maps, short videos, and discussions using Flipgrid. Participants will also gain strategies to integrate active learning activities into courses such as peer-review and self-reflection using Eduflow. Motivating students and building collaboration and community online can be challenging. In an environment where an increasing number of courses will need to be delivered either partially or fully online, student motivation and collaboration are imperative. Drawing inspiration from real-life examples, and simulated assignments, this short course will provide a framework of how two currently available programs (Eduflow and Flipgrid) can help to increase student motivation, engagement, and understanding.

Service-Learning in an Online Environment

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Leigh Hersey, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Although service-learning has been a component of higher education curriculum for decades, it has had a resurgence as universities are looking for ways to stay connected to the community at large. Service-learning opportunities are traditionally very hands-on in nature with the expectation that students will work together in their communities. As more programs are moving online, either permanently or due to community crisis situations, it is important for faculty to develop service-learning opportunities that can be adapted to online learning. This professional development opportunity will provide guidance on incorporating service-learning and community-based learning projects into an online environment. It will include an overview of service-learning, examples of projects, and tools. The entire course will consist of three modules, each lasting approximately 45 minutes. Upon completion of the professional development opportunity, faculty will have a better understanding of service-learning. They will also learn about ways to incorporate it into their curriculum. Module 1 will provide an overview of service-learning, including the theoretical frameworks, challenges and benefits of service-learning, and understanding the continuum of community-based learning. Module 2 will focus on examples of how service-learning can be conducted in an online environment. During this module, participants will have the opportunity to discuss their ideas for projects and brainstorm ways they can turn assignments into service-learning opportunities. The final Module will walk through a toolkit of resources that may be helpful for those exploring service-learning, such as grading assignments and partner agreements. Content will be appropriate for both undergraduate and graduate courses.

Engaging Students through Moodle Lessons and Zoom features

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Mallory Benedetto, University of Louisiana at Monroe

This Moodle Course will assist participants in creating online learning experiences for students that engage them with the material. Moodle Lessons and the poll and breakout room features of Zoom will be discussed and demonstrated as tools to build activities that give students increased contact with the material in ways that require critical thinking and construction of knowledge. It is increasingly important for instructors to be able to assess student knowledge and preparedness throughout a course, and this module will present ideas on facilitating online courses with active learning experiences and activities that provide benefits similar to those that can be accomplished in a face-to-face setting. Participants will have an opportunity to build a Moodle Lesson relevant to a course they teach as well as discuss ideas for active learning in their discipline. Through a combination of synchronous and asynchronous activities, this module will demonstrate effective online learning tools and create a collaborative environment to generate ideas to improve the online learning experience for students.

A Complete Package of Tools for Remote Advising

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Steven Toaddy, Louisiana Tech University

Based specifically on each participant’s needs and circumstances, we’ll iron out the logistics of coördinating and executing on large- or small-scale, low- or high-touch advising practices for course scheduling and/or for providing general/career advice.

Student Orientation: Start with Success

Session 3 July 6-13
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Jessica Griggs, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Participants in this course will learn about the various components needed in an online orientation course to set students up for success from the beginning of their program. Components include: 1) navigating the online Learning Management System, 2) contacting University faculty and staff, 3) connecting with other students in the same programs to form a sense of community, 4) utilizing campus resources in an online format, etc. Course participants should be able to form the framework for an online orientation course of their own at the end of the course. Participants are free to complete all modules in the course at one time or spread out throughout the duration of the course.

Creating Inclusive and Student-focused Curricula

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Jacinta Saffold, University of New Orleans

The world is on fire but we’re online, and teaching in the face of a racially charged national moment is difficult. This course provides 21st century approaches to cultivating an inclusive environment, where students feel comfortable critically engaging on the subjects of race, gender, and other socially constructed difference.

Monitoring Engagement: Moodle Tools for Tracking Student Activity

Session 4 July 20-27
Track 1

Course Facilitator:  Christopher Coleman, Louisiana Tech University

With online courses, it is imperative that students engage with course material in a timely fashion. The problem is, how do you tell if they are doing that? In this session, we will look at features built into the Moodle learning management system that, with a little bit of work, can be used to drastically improve your insight into student activity. Things we will explore include: using completion tracking to monitor student progression through a course; using Moodle competencies to align activities to specific instructional goals and objectives; and understanding Moodle logs to get a clear picture of what students are doing. Users of all levels of comfort with Moodle are welcome!

Virtual Tutoring Using Canvas BigBlueButton

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Tasha Heard, Grambling State University

BigBlueButton is the built-in virtual classroom solution for Canvas. Faculty and students alike can benefit from utilizing this component for outside the classroom enrichment sessions with student who need additional assistance. The goal for this course is to provide professional development to faculty on how to set-up tutorial sessions with students using BigBlueButton via Canvas.  Prior to COVID-19, many faculty members provided students with F2F tutorial services, however this component provides faculty with an alternative strategy for providing tutorial services.

Equity Pedagogy in Online Learning

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Jerry Parker, Southeastern Louisiana University

Teaching online is a labor of love that allows faculty members to be technological artists. For the inexperienced faculty member, online education is seen as a “cheat fest”. However, with practice, many faculty members quickly learn that most times the students in their courses are full-time employees, single parents, non-traditional students, students living in a different city, state, or country, or on-campus students who needed another option. Because online education is still new and technology advances daily, faculty can never be 100% sure of what can and cannot be done. Although it is very convenient for faculty members to replicate the same strategies of teaching in each unit and in each of their online courses, when teaching diverse groups of learners, it is important to engage all students with the course content by utilizing a number of teaching strategies that facilitate academic success for everyone. This mode of teaching in its simplest form is defined as Equity Pedagogy. The purpose of this course is to introduce faculty members to several teaching strategies that will allow them to vary the ways in which students engage with their course content. By the end of this course, participants should be knowledgeable of various teaching strategies in their online courses. Although this is not a comprehensive introduction to Equity Pedagogy, this course is a start for those wishing to maximize student success via diversity in their teaching in online spaces.

TILT: Transparency in Learning and Teaching

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Eric van Holm, University of New Orleans

Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT) is a teaching technique developed by Dr. Mary-Ann Winkelmas that emphasizes three aspects of communicating course content: The purpose, the task, and the criteria. When designing an assignment, you should craft it with an explanation in mind of its relevance to the course overall, and what students will learn or demonstrate through its completion (purpose). The assignment should also be described in detail so that students understand what is expected (task). Finally, the criteria for assessment should be detailed so students know what to expect. By emphasizing those three aspects, assignments become more united with the overall goals of a class. The main emphasis of TILT is not only on offering an explanation to your students, but to reflect how each assignment reflects the core concepts of a class. By offering a clear and persuasive explanation for the importance of each assignment and its relevance to core concepts, it can result it more connected learning and better submitted work. Students in the module will be asked to read materials, complete a quiz, and practice ‘tilting’ one of their own assignments through discussion boards.

Designing Accessible Teaching Materials in the Digital World

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Manyu Li, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

This course introduces techniques to create accessible online content that is accessible and ADA-compliant.  It is expected that upon completion of the course, participants will be able to identify issues faced by students with disabilities and the general guidelines that are established to remove barriers for students with disabilities.  Participants will also be able to identify assistive technologies that are helpful for students with disabilities.  Finally, participants will be able to identify and apply technological tools to create a universal design.  The course contains three modules, including 1) web accessibility guidelines, 2) assistive technologies and 3) tools and resources to incorporate universal design.  In the first module, common issues faced by students with different disabilities and corresponding web accessibility guidelines will be discussed.  In the second module, common assistive technologies will be introduced.  Ways to apply these assistive technologies in a course design will be discussed. In the third and last module, technological tools that enable instructors to teach with a universal design will be introduced.  All course activities are asynchronous and self-paced.  Participants should expect to spend 6 – 8 hours for completing the course.  Participants will be provided with readings and resources relating to the topics and will engage in discussion forums.

Best Practices for Creating Lecture Videos

Session 6 July 27 - August 3
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Tiffany Jackson

This course is designed to provide instructors with an overview of the Universal Design for Learning Framework and demonstrate how to effectively integrate videos into their virtual learning space by applying best practices to create interactive micro-lectures that will engage students and increase learning and retention.  Using a flipped classroom model, learners will have an opportunity to explore various web-based tools and learning management system (LMS) plugins that can be used to design course lectures that align with Quality Matter Specific Review Standards 8.3 and 8.4. so that participants with learning and physical deficiencies will have equity of access.  All learning activities will be experiential, interactive, low-stakes, and asynchronous (self-paced).  Learners will receive actionable, timely feedback from the course instructor and their peers to assist them in mastering the concepts and meeting the course objectives.  The course will require a maximum of 4 hours to complete.   Participants will be required to respond to a course evaluation survey at the end of the course in order to receive a badge for successful completion.

Incorporating Low-cost Augmented/Virtual Reality Technologies in Education

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Manyu Li, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

This course introduces creative ways to adopt low-cost augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) course contents.  It is expected that upon completion of the course, participants will be able to describe ways that AR/VR is used in educational settings, identify low-cost tools for using AR/VR in education, and identify and applying existing educational resources using AR/VR.  The course contains three modules, including 1) introduction to AR/VR application in education, 2) low-cost AR/VR tools available for educational purposes, and 3) creation or application of AR/VR educational resources.  In the first module, examples of definitions of AR/VR will be explained.  Examples of educational resources in AR/VR across different disciplines will be introduced.  In the second module, resources on low-cost AR/VR tools and applications will be introduced.  The pros and cons of the tools will be discussed.  In the third and last module, existing educational resources on AR/VR will be shared.  These existing educational resources allow instructors to adopt AR/VR in their classrooms quickly without much time or financial costs. In addition, ways to create new educational resources will also be discussed.  All course activities are asynchronous.  Participants should expect to spend 6 – 8 hours for completing the course.  Participants will be provided with readings and resources relating to the topics and will engage in discussion forums to exchange ideas on how AR/VR technologies can be applied to their classrooms.

Collaboration, Communication, Creativity: Web 2.0 Tools to Engage Students

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Dustin Hebert

In this course, participants will explore selected Web 2.0 tools to foster collaboration, communication, and creativity. Successful completion of the course will include the creation of three products, one from each category, that participants may use as teaching tools in face-to-face or online courses. Participants will be asked to share one of their three products with peers in the course, and peers will be asked to test the products and provide constructive feedback. The course will be organized into four modules, one for each tool category and one for peer feedback, scheduled over a 4-day period. Participant time commitment is estimated at one hour per day, depending upon how many Web 2.0 tools a participant chooses to explore and how much time he/she devotes to creating and reviewing sample products.

In Person Small Group Discussions

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Eric van Holm

A ongoing problem of online classes is the lack of social interaction for students, particularly with their classmates. In particular, in-person discussions allow students to work through material together, generate shared understanding, and add a communal element to classes. Teachers have commonly attempted to address this shortcoming in online classes with virtual  discussion boards, but these often lack significant engagement, sustained interaction, or the building of community. As a replacement for online discussion boards, virtual in-person small group discussions have been proposed as a means to foster community while maintaining the flexibility of online classes. This course will describe the procedure and process of establishing and managing in-person small group discussions in an online class. As part of the class students will be provided a reading on the potential benefits of the method, an existing rubric for the assignment, and participate in their own in person small group discussion.

Virtual Office Hours: Tips and Strategies

Session 4 July 13-20
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Katie Barrow, Louisiana Tech University

This course will help instructors identify and implement a variety of strategies for planning and holding virtual office hours. Course participants will learn tips for staying connected to students via multiple avenues that take into consideration modality of communication, accessibility, and cost, among other factors. Upon completion, participants will be able to (1) identify and describe various types of accessible and inaccessible online communication modalities and platforms, and (2) identify and implement online communication tools and applications for holding accessible instructor-student meetings.

Generation Z(oom): Strategies for Engaging Underrepresented Students in Virtual Spaces

Session 7 August 3 - 7
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Ruben Henderson, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

This session will focus on providing strategies working with underrepresented students in virtual spaces on our college campuses. It will also provide guidance to ensure that diversity, equity and inclusion are centered in digital engagement. At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to 1) identify strategies for providing psychological support to underrepresented students, 2) discover how to create and cultivate diverse and inclusive spaces for students that are welcoming and engaging, 3) use supportive activities, ideas and practices in virtual spaces, and 4) enhance their diversity, equity and inclusion lens to develop digital engagement.

Respondus LockDown Browser and Monitor 

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Jonathan Young, University of Louisiana at Monroe

This course will explore Respondus LockDown Browser, Respondus Monitor, and related online exam security topics to increase participants’ level of confidence with both using the tools and being able to trust the results of such assessments. These software tools will be approached specifically within the context of the Moodle Learning Management System (LMS). However, the more general online exam security topics and best practices with have broader range application with regards to online instruction. The participant will explore what each of these tools do, when certain tools should be applied, where tool configurations and reported data are located, why online assessment security is not one-size-fits-all, and how to combine best practices to maintain integrity of online assessments. Attention will also be given to how to analyze the data that the LockDown Browser as well as the Monitor products via the Respondus Dashboard within Moodle present. Care will be taken to avoid reading too much into the data. Consideration will also be given to how to cross-reference the Repondus data with Moodle to get the larger picture of an assessment. The course will employ two optional Zoom sessions as a form of office hours with the facilitator to ask any questions for clarification concerning the topics presented within. Final deliverables within the course will be a case study/quiz on selecting appropriate measures and technologies to employ for specific instructor assessment situations and construction of a “rainy day” plan for when something goes wrong or students lack access to the technical prerequisites.

Visually Engaging Syllabus

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Paul Kim, Grambling State University

Create a compelling syllabus that your students will want to read.  A course syllabus describes what is being taught, who is teaching it, why it is important, how learners are evaluated, and how to succeed. The syllabus communicates essential information, yet students often give it no more than a cursory glance. Instructors can use strategies to make students read the syllabus more closely, but we can also provide them with a more engaging syllabus. This 3-hour professional development course introduces simple visual communication and document design principles to help instructors create a syllabus that is more inviting and accessible. Participants will learn techniques for effectively combining text with images, apply those techniques to their own syllabus, and draft a revised syllabus using visual content creation tools.

Creating Equity Through Multiple Learning Pathways

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Tiffany Jackson, Grambling State University

This course is designed to provide instructors with a broad overview of multiple learning pathways (MLPs) and demonstrate how MLPs can be used to ensure equity of access for all learners.  Using a flipped classroom model, learners will have an opportunity to explore various web-based tools and learning management system (LMS) plugins that can be used to differentiate instructional strategies, resources, activities, and assessments for an online environment that align with the Universal Design for Learning Framework.  All learning activities will be experiential, interactive, low-stakes, and asynchronous (self-paced).  Learners will receive actionable, timely feedback from the course instructor and their peers to assist them in mastering the concepts and meeting the course objectives.  The course will require a maximum of 3 hours to complete.   Participants will be required to respond to a course evaluation survey at the end of the course in order to receive a badge for successful completion. 

Instructional Video

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Pavel Samosonov, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Instructional video is a hands-on training in which participants will examine and develop techniques for creating instructional video based on the Quality Matters design standards. This course is taught online in the asynchronous mode. The course covers the pedagogy and best practices of creating and applying instructional video using free and easy-to-use software downloadable from the Internet. The participants will respond to the reading assignments, participate in online discussions and develop their own projects. The participants will develop a theory- and practice-based understanding of the effectiveness of instructional video as part of online course design. By the end of the course the participants will create a QM-standard-based capstone instructional video project as part of their online/hybrid course in their disciplines. The participants will stay in close communication with the instructor and the peers during the training. By the end of the training the participants will conduct peer reviews of the projects using the essential QM standards.

Using Guided Journal Clubs to Promote Evidence-Based Practice and Critical Thinking Skills In an Online Environment

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Janet Jones, Southeastern Louisiana University

There is a significant gap between the scientific knowledge available, its effectiveness, and application in daily practice. Evidence-based practice consists of scientific evidence, clinical experience, and patient preferences. Journal clubs are well known teaching methods within clinical disciplines. The purpose of this module is to assist educators in designing online assignments using journal clubs to promote evidence-based practice and critical appraisal skills using the group process. Learning Objectives: Describe the components of evidence-based practice and guided journal clubs. 1) Develop and implement a guided journal club assignment with a learning management system for higher education students. 2) Assess the student’s satisfaction, knowledge, evidence practice abilities, group process skills, and application to practice or experiential learning activities. This Faculty Development Program will be developed in the Moodle Learning Management System. The course format will be based on Course Alignment Principles. The Peralta Equity Rubric will be utilized in construction of the faculty development program and in instructions for developing and implementing student assignments. The program will consist of two modules and require approximately 45 minutes each for a total of 1 ½ hours. Resources will include posted files, folders, links to websites, videos, and discussion formats. Upon conclusion of the course the participant will complete a Course Evaluation that will address the course navigation, content, instructor effectiveness, satisfaction, and future plans for utilizing the content.

What is all the Hype about HyperDocs?

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Lisa Flanders-Dick, Louisiana Tech University

The “What is all the Hype about HyperDocs?” professional development will introduce you to HyperDocs and how they can be integrated into a course, professional development, or meeting.  The culminating activity is the creation of your own HyperDoc utilizing your choice of Microsoft or Google tools.  Throughout this professional development, you will collect valuable resources for your future HyperDocs projects. 

21st Century Learning Skills in Moodle

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Stacie Austin, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Participants will learn to incorporate the 4C’s of 21st century learning skills into Moodle courses. Creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, and communication will be the basis of instruction with how to video instruction and participant created resources. Participants will develop an introductory or instructional video based on a selected course or objective from their field of expertise. Participants will also create a collaborative assignment to use in their virtual classroom, while demonstrating an understanding of 21st Century learning skills: creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication. Instructional videos (using screen share software) will support learners that are unfamiliar with the Moodle platform. Advanced options will be shared and optional. More importantly, the resources created by participants will be usable in their own Moodle courses. The course will likely require a 2.5 hour time commitment for discussion boards and low stakes assignments. The assignments will have value beyond the PD course.

Embedded Librarianship

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Megan Lowe, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Embedded librarianship is not a new concept. It has been used by librarians for quite some time, particularly in higher education. Embedded librarianship is a form of collaboration and offers faculty a way of helping their students (and even themselves!) connect with library and research resources. Embedded librarianship may be thought of as a spectrum, with the faculty/instructor determining how much involvement the librarian has in any given course. That involvement can be as simple as a dedicated librarian for a course to co-teaching the class. Embedded librarianship takes the librarian out of the library and places them in the context of a particular course and/or discipline, connecting faculty/instructors and students more directly and meaningfully with library resources and services, not to mention the body of literature and resources associated with that course and/or discipline. This course will introduce participants to the concept of embedded librarianship and explore the aforementioned spectrum of activities and collaborative/cooperative activities. It will outline the benefits of embedded librarianship and how it supports faculty/instructors and students, especially in an online environment. Given how higher education may have to rely more heavily on online education in the current environment, the need to continue to support faculty/instructors and students actively in online environments will only increase. Librarians can help provide that support and ensure that users remain connected to critical library resources and services, whether in quarantine or not.

Virtual Advising: Best Practices for Student Affairs Professionals and Advisors to Engage Student Leaders

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Rudolph Ellis & Danielle Williams, Grambling State University

This 4-session course will focus on best practices of Student Engagement outside of the classroom. It will address practices and ways that Student Affairs professionals can engage advisors and student leaders in a virtual setting. The collaborative project consists of three phrases known as ICD: Identify, Collaborate, and Design. Participants will be able to identify what works through discussion and research, collaborate and develop best practices and modules for their student leaders, and design an online Safe Space that advisors and student leaders can use to meet.

From the Desk to the Screen: Developing a Virtual Advising Model

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Kandace Formaggio, Southeastern Louisiana University

Almost overnight, colleges and universities transitioned to provide remote services in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Likewise, the Center for Student Excellence at Southeastern Louisiana University has had to re-think how to provide academic advising and coaching in lieu of meeting our students face-to-face. We have created a robust virtual advising process using various productivity software programs while still providing a caring and meaningful advising experience. This course will illustrate how to provide a virtual academic advising experience and how to streamline your academic advising process by creating an all-electronic system using various open-source productivity software programs, including Calendly, Zoom, and Google Drive, and Document Studio. You, too, can create an online process at little to no cost. Course participants will: 1) learn to create a structured academic advising meeting, 2) learn to implement Calendly or other electronic scheduling tools, 3) learn to implement Zoom or Google Meet as a virtual meeting place, 4) learn to create an electronic advising form process using Google Suite and Google Add-ons (Google Forms, Google Sheets, Document Studio), and 5) learn to track advisees by creating a dashboard using Google Sheets.

Mental Health Resources

Session 5 July 20-27
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Jada Hector, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

This course aims to offer mental health resources for faculty and staff to better inform and help their students, and themselves. Faculty will better understand resources at the university, local, and nationwide levels to use in their respective university communities. Additionally, faculty will learn more about boundaries and best practices when working with students to offer the best support, as well as keep themselves healthy while everyone is impacted by COVID-19. Upon completion of this course, attendees will gain practical items to incorporate in both their courses and daily interactions with the student population and campus community.

Creating and Grading Quizzes in Moodle

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Yanzhu Wu and Andrea Leonard, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

A crucial part of course design is assessments. Assessments are used to measure student achievement of the course learning objectives. Grading and interpreting the results of these assessments can improve the instructor’s understanding of student learning. Types of assessments affect decisions on achieving different learning objectives according to the Bloom’s Taxonomy. The Quiz activity is a powerful tool, native to Moodle, that can be used for assessments. In this asynchronous course, participants will explore different types of quiz questions, address different scenarios where each type is appropriate, and learn how to organize them in the question bank using categories. Next, participants will learn how to create the quiz activity and how to configure the settings for a variety of needs. Finally, participants will experience grading quizzes using both automatically and manually graded questions. They will also review and interpret overall quiz results and learn how these can signal the need for student remediation and improved course design. To successfully complete this asynchronous course, participants will work through the following 3 Modules:  Module 1: Creating and Organizing Questions; Module 2: Creating a Quiz Activity; Module 3: Grading Quizzes and Interpreting Results.   Participants must fully engage with all learning activities and successfully complete 3 end-of-Module Quizzes at the 85% level or higher in order to earn a Certificate of Completion.

Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons Licensing (CCL)

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Megan Lowe, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Though copyright and fair use have long been components of researching and publishing, whether in the college classroom or at the scholarly level, these issues have gained renewed and reconsidered interest in the wake of COVID-19. Identifying and making use of resources to continue providing meaningful education remotely became a challenge. Many faculty had concerns about what kinds of resources could and could not be used ‘safely’ in terms of copyright. The presenter received many queries regarding the viability and propriety of using digital resources in online instruction (though some of these queries arose in the wake of increased online instruction in general prior to the quarantine). Consequently, the presenter realized a need for a course to help faculty and instructors understand copyright and fair use, with the latter being key to teaching, learning, and research interests. As part of understanding intellectual property (IP) and IP rights, this course will cover Creative Commons Licensing (CCL) and how it represents an alternative to traditional copyright. CCL represents a way to disseminate and share scholarly information and knowledge with greater freedom than traditional copyright while still operating within that framework. Participants will learn the characteristics and pros/cons of copyright, fair use, and the six major types of CCL.

Experiential Learning Online

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Cherissa Vitter, Southeastern Louisiana University

The priority for experiential course design is to create a learning environment where students can gain understanding through experiences, regardless of the delivery.   Learning is done by the learner in any environment. In a virtual classroom, many types of experiential learning techniques are valid for the success of the learner.  The virtual environment provides an opportunity for learners to explore differentiated instruction through experiential education.

Technology should be a tool, not the driving force.  As educators move courses to online experiences, they must examine if technology is influencing the essence of the course.  Technology will influence the structure, but the foundation of the course should remain intact.  This course experience is set up for participants as a model for experiential learning online to include the incorporation of various platforms and informal assessment models to inform virtual instruction.  Topics explored during this course include:  1. Constructivism and the social context, 2.Experiential education ecosystem, 3. Differentiation, 4. Using assessment to inform instruction, 5. Value of reflection. The goal for the course is for the participant to provide a learning environment where the learner may deepen his or her understanding of the content related to the objectives and student outcomes. By the end of the course, participants will be able to facilitate an online learning environment through course delivery techniques by demonstrating an understanding of experiential learning online

Enhancing the Educational Experience by Adding Transparency

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Anne Case-Hanks, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Transparency is an intentional course design aspect to enhance the student experience. This class will introduce the topic of transparency within a class including the syllabus and assessments.  It will highlight key elements of the equitable framework including using backward design and aligning assessments with course objectives

Virtual Support Program for Students in Recovery for Alcohol and Drug Abuse on the Campus of Northwestern State University

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Charles King, Northwestern State University

Alcohol and drugs continue to be a recognized problem on college campuses. For many students, the leap to college is loaded with challenges exacerbated by academic pressure and social problems. These problems often make it quite difficult for students to adjust to college life. Adjusting to the changes that come with college life while learning to maintain the steps needed for recovery can quickly become an overwhelming process. For students who may be struggling with a drug addiction, the transition to college can bring many triggers and challenges. As a professor, I have witnessed first-hand the effects of alcohol and drugs on college campuses. Overcoming addiction is the first part of the journey, but recovery continues throughout a lifetime. According to the Betty Ford Institute, the definition of recovery is “a voluntarily maintained lifestyle characterized by sobriety, personal health, and citizenship.” The Betty Ford’s definition of recovery is widely used because it encompasses the diversity of beliefs about recovery without advocating for any philosophical position. The purpose of this course is to address the urgent need for a virtual support program for students in recovery for alcohol and drug abuse on the campus of Northwestern State University. Students in recovery are challenged by a college environment that offers easy access to drugs and alcohol and a college culture that promote the misuse of substances. The virtual recovery program will provide a platform for students to develop certain skills that may lead to long-term recovery after drug use or treatment.

Recognizing Behaviors that May Lead to Stop/Drop-Out

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 4

Course Facilitator: David Khey, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

What happens to students when they stop participating in our courses, particularly our remote/online courses in the time of COVID-19? Were there any warning signs that we, as professors and administrators, can pick up on before stop-out or drop out occurs? Now that we are in tumultuous times, rethinking stop-out and drop out is critical. This workshop guides learners on the state of knowledge that exists outside of those high-paid consultancy firms on the topic of stop/drop-out. Together, we will explore novel ways to intervene, reduce barriers to reentry, and try to make graduation a reality for more of our student population.

Cultivating a Climate of Inclusion for the LGBTQ+ Community

Session 6 July 27- August 3
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Taniecea Mallery, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

This course inspires participants to cultivate a climate of inclusion for LGBTQ+ students, faculty and staff by outlining resources that institutions can establish for promoting education, engagement, and empowering practices. At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to: 1) describe the unique experiences of LGBTQ+ students in higher education, 2) identify resources to support the education and engagement of LGBTQ+ students, 3) demonstrate an understanding of vocabulary terms relevant to the LGBTQ+ community, and 4) create a listing of personal action steps for cultivating a climate of inclusion for the LGBTQ+ community.

Using Poll Everywhere During Online Live Lecture Sessions

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 1

Course Facilitator: Rebecca Hamm, University of Louisiana at Monroe

Poll Everywhere is an audience response system used typically during live lecture presentations. Engaging students and assessing knowledge can prove difficult outside of the traditional classroom especially during synchronous live lecture sessions. Because of its mobile-based design, Poll Everywhere eliminates the need for hardware devices or clickers which allows responses from anyone at any location as long as they have internet access and a link to the poll. Questions or “polls” can be added to involve learners and gauge their comprehension of the material being presented and responses are available immediately. This course will teach you how to use Poll Everywhere and how to embed the system in your existing Powerpoints. The course will also discuss creative methods of using Poll Everywhere’s features in addition to employing standard multiple choice questioning.

Incorporating Engaging and Accessible Feedback in Online Learning

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 2

Course Facilitator: Katie Barrow, Louisiana Tech University

Providing feedback on coursework is an important component for maintaining student engagement and encouraging active participation. This course will introduce multiple creative strategies for providing feedback that is both accessible and useful for online learning success. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to identify various types of feedback, modalities through which feedback can be filtered, and strategies for managing and delivering holistic feedback in online settings.

Creating Narrated Video Lessons for Student Success Through Screencasting

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Cynthia Vavasseur, Nicholls State University

Screencasting is a powerful tool for online learning that can be easily implemented into classes to aid in student success.  In this learning experience, faculty will make a recording of their computer screen while narrating a lesson for online students.  Your screen can show a PowerPoint, PDF, Word document, Website, etc, while you discuss content with your students.  Screencast o matic, a free tool, will be utilized to make 15 minute videos.  After creating a screencast, faculty will learn to upload it to YouTube and link it to Moodle or other learning management system.  After mastering the basics of screencasting, faculty will learn how to utilize the screencast o matic app along with Jamboard to create recordings while utilizing a digital whiteboard.  The pairing of the screencast o matic app and Jamboard will allow faculty to annotate a worksheet, work problems on a blank screen, or draw diagrams to aid in student learning.  Faculty will end by brainstorming innovative ways to utilize screencasting, and discuss best practices for making screencasts that are accessible for all students.

Designing Simple and Interactive Lessons in Online Courses

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Jerry Parker, Southeastern Louisiana University

Online education can be overwhelming for certain faculty members. The amount of clicking, copying, pasting, uploading, and downloading can be very confusing. Computer literacy skills take a long time to build and vary depending on the field. More importantly, the tools that are available and that are needed fluctuate as well. Learning Management Systems (LMS) such as Moodle, Canvas, Blackboard, and Google Classroom all have different features and require multiple steps to accomplish the same tasks. The purpose of this course is to provide faculty members with an alternative way to create quick, easy, and thorough interactive lessons that vary across Bloom’s Taxonomy and only require a Microsoft Word document. Bloom’s Taxonomy in online education is important because it will allow students to engage with the course material at various levels. Students will be allowed to think in different and creative ways and construct new understandings of old knowledge. Likewise, by keeping the information held within a Microsoft Word document it is easier and less time consuming for faculty members to create and grade course assignments without having to constantly ask for help. By the end of this course, participants will be knowledgeable of the basics of Microsoft Word and how to create course activities that incorporate multiple levels of Blooms Taxonomy in one lesson. 

One Size Does Not Fit All: 15 Dynamic Learning Activities for Diverse Learners

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 3

Course Facilitators: Janeal White, McNeese State University

Read a chapter. Write a paper. Take a test.  While a tried and true model for early online courses, it no longer meets the diverse needs of all learners.  In the online setting, educators have the profound opportunity, and responsibility, to guide students in building their knowledge using an ever-evolving toolbox of digital tools, resources, and platforms.  Pulling together principles from constructivism, e-learning theory, and adult learning theory, educators can create a powerful learning experience that honors the individuality of each student while also guiding students toward achievement of learning objectives. Participants will be introduced to a matrix of the primary learning preferences combined with the cognitive domains originated by Benjamin Bloom, to ensure addressing the educational needs of students. Participants in this 3-hour professional development session will explore basic principles of constructivism and adult learning theory through 15 dynamic learning activities that promote content mastery in diverse educational settings using multi-sensory modalities. Ideal for differentiating lessons for student needs using growth mindset, presented activities will provide a strong foundation upon which many additional activities can be based.  Word clouds, cartoon strips, infographics, and pasta art are just a sampling of the unique activities that will be highlighted during the session. Participants will view examples and be invited to practice some of the presented activities.  How To guides and example prompts, rubrics, and syllabi descriptions will be provided.  Synchronous participants will be invited to attend a live discussion session while asynchronous attendees will have access to previously recorded sessions. 

Student Engagement to Enhance Online Learning

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 3

Course Facilitator: Eboni Brown, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Remote instruction and online learning have become mainstream staple for education throughout the country and world. When delivering the educational services online, there are unique opportunities and considerations that impact students’ behaviors and their attitudes about the mode of instructions. Online engagement is vital for student success. According to Wiley Services (2020) student are frustrated with the following matters: lack of instructor interaction, inconsistency across courses, timeliness of instructor’s feedback, heavy workload, lack of clarity of expectations, quality of instructor’s feedback, and lack of interaction with classmates. A healthy level of engagement can bridge the gap in the digital world. Chen, Lambert, and Guidry (2010) suggested that student engagement in learning has a more significant impact on learning outcomes than who students are or where they enrolled to study. This online engagement course offers instructors an opportunity to think more deeply about the associated indicators of engagement: to think about how engagement might look in relation to better supporting the diversity of students engaging in online study and to consider a framework that consist of the five key elements of online engagement. The framework offers a reference point for thinking about the elements and types of engagement that might better afford opportunities for students to share the richness of their backgrounds, experiences, and understandings with others. It also asks us, as faculty, to think about the types of engagement that provide equitable and effective learning and teaching opportunities for all students

The Power of Positivity

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Chanin Monestero, University of Louisiana at Monroe

This course focuses on the basics of simple positive student interaction and its power to build a safe and positive learning community in the online classroom. Participants will build a positive learning environment by interacting in intentional ways with all students all the time. Participants will set this tone by using student names during each interaction, thanking students for reaching out, and focusing on tone during interactions. Participants will personally welcome each student to the course within an introduction forum where all students post an introduction and then receive a personalized welcome to the course from the instructor. Participants will reach out to at-risk students weekly with a positive and informative message that seeks to keep lines of communication open and offers assistance. Participants will use a way-to-go email towards the completion of each course to interact with those students who perhaps have not been in contact with the instructor because they are high performers. Participants will apply practical strategies in dealing with difficult students by responding with the elements of The Kindness Challenge by Shaunti Feldhahn. Participants will begin to model the desired behaviors during our course interactions. I will ask participants to create the templates for messages that they can use right away in their next teaching assignments. I will ask how participants plan to implement these ideas in their next courses and then follow-up by email to see if they successfully implemented these strategies and what changes they saw as a result.

Calendar Use for Time Management Help in the Online Classroom

Session 7 August 3-7
Track 4

Course Facilitator: Melissa Kiper, ULM

This course is intended to improve teaching and learning outcomes in the online classroom. A successful online student possesses three things among others: ability to plan, ability to visualize the course as a process, and ability to use a calendar as a tool. After taking this course, the instructor will be able to teach his/her student techniques for high performance such as time management skills, while discouraging procrastination. The instructor will teach the student to think of each course assignment as a process versus an event, starting at the end of the process and working backwards, and teaching strategies to schedule study time to coincide with other extracurricular activities. The instructor will teach his/her students how to organize the course by using an Outlook Calendar. The student will be able to display self-discipline in creating a calendar to prioritize assignments and study for tests. The calendar will help with course workload, types of labor, due dates, and scheduling. It will have the student asking what problems do they foresee while taking the online course and when are good times and places for him/her to study. This course will give the instructor ready-made assignments to share with students at the beginning of the course to increase success in their online course.

Become a part of the UL System family

Support our mission to enhance the quality of life for Louisiana's citizens.